Chapter

The Fear of Forgetting

Emma Hanna

in The Great War on the Small Screen

Published by Edinburgh University Press

Published in print October 2009 | ISBN: 9780748633890
Published online September 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780748671175 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3366/edinburgh/9780748633890.003.0008
The Fear of Forgetting

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Preview

Since the 1960s television has been a self-defining subject where the production and reactivation of history has occurred on the screen. Television documentaries about the First World War developed not as objective assessments of past events but as media events. The televisual histories of 1914-18 have been built on Britain's rich cultural inheritance which has been fashioned from established modes of remembrance. The act of producing, broadcasting and watching television programmes about the conflict has become a remembrance ritual in its own right. Television documentaries about the First World War are alternative war memorials for new generations of British television viewers. Documentaries will continue to act as expressions of grief fashioned from established modes of remembrance, and the continued presence of the conflict on British television will ensure that the memory of 1914-18 is a wound that may never heal.

Keywords: Remembrance

Chapter.  4475 words. 

Subjects: Television

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