Chapter

Clerical Perceptions of Sufi Practices in Late Seventeenth-Century Persia, II: Al-Hurr al-ʿAmili (d. 1693) and the Debate on the Permissibility of <i>Ghina</i>

Andrew J. Newman

in Living Islamic History

Published by Edinburgh University Press

Published in print April 2010 | ISBN: 9780748637386
Published online March 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780748653218 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3366/edinburgh/9780748637386.003.0013
Clerical Perceptions of Sufi Practices in Late Seventeenth-Century Persia, II: Al-Hurr al-ʿAmili (d. 1693) and the Debate on the Permissibility of Ghina

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The anti-Sufi polemic that marked Iran’s spiritual discourse during the seventeenth century was no mere obscure discussion. Although visible during the century flowing from the 1501 establishment of Twelver Shi،ism by the Safavid dynasty as the realm’s official faith, beginning in the seventeenth century, attacks on Sufism and, increasingly, on such alleged Sufi practices as singing (ghina), were a marked feature of the religious landscape. In the middle of the years of the second Safavid century, anti-Sufism discourse was well developed and had already erupted out of the mosque/madrasa. This chapter examines how anti-Sufism discourse in the early period of the Safavids in the seventeenth century gave way in some circles to a more moderate position that reflected the orientation of the Court on this matter. To show this, it uses the corpus of Imami and Akhbari hadiths to make the point.

Keywords: anti-Sufi polemic; Iran’s spiritual discourse; seventeenth century; attacks on Sufism; singing (ghina); anti-Sufism discourse; Imami; Akhbari hadiths

Chapter.  7033 words. 

Subjects: Society and Culture

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