Chapter

Aspect-Blindness in Religion, Philosophy, and Law: The Force of Wittgensteinian Reading

Christopher C Robinson

in Wittgenstein and Political Theory

Published by Edinburgh University Press

Published in print November 2009 | ISBN: 9780748639144
Published online March 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780748652839 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3366/edinburgh/9780748639144.003.0006
Aspect-Blindness in Religion, Philosophy, and Law: The Force of Wittgensteinian Reading

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Aspect-blindness is a condition that Wittgenstein posits in order to create a contrast to the experience of changes in aspect. This chapter examines the relationship between language-games and aspect-blindness. Can some language-games be so rigid they curtail linguistic creativity extensively enough to induce aspect/meaning blindness, and vice versa? Does the experience of aspect-blindness give an intimate view of the effect of ideology on perception? This chapter defines ideology in Marxian terms as a super-structural or cultural effect that masks reality and directs vision away from the social sources of pain and leaves the sufferer, a person or a class, with no recourse other than seeking relief in religion or stoicism. This chapter also examines Plato's early dialogue, ‘Euthyphro’, and Antonin Scalia's opinion in the case of Michael H. v. Gerald D.

Keywords: aspect-blindness; Wittgenstein; language-games; linguistic creativity; perception; Euthyphro; Antonin Scalia

Chapter.  8045 words. 

Subjects: Political Theory

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