Chapter

Never Too Late? On the Implications of Deleuze's Work on Death for a Deleuzian Moral Philosophy

James Williams

in Deleuze and Ethics

Published by Edinburgh University Press

Published in print May 2011 | ISBN: 9780748641178
Published online September 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780748671731 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3366/edinburgh/9780748641178.003.0011
Never Too Late? On the Implications of Deleuze's Work on Death for a Deleuzian Moral Philosophy

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This chapter argues that when constructing a Deleuzian moral philosophy, it will be important to keep in mind the negative aspects of this strong relation drawn between Deleuze's critique of identity, his division of death into two, and his demonstrations that it is only death as impersonal that secures a projection into the future. A case-based and open pragmatism is a good candidate for building sensitive moral guidelines, but it will be important to remember that, at least in relation to death, it is neither as open nor as singular as one might think.

Keywords: Deleuze; death; moral philosophy; identity

Chapter.  8181 words. 

Subjects: Moral Philosophy

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