Chapter

The Philosopher, As Such, and the Death Penalty

Peggy Kamuf

in To Follow

Published by Edinburgh University Press

Published in print October 2010 | ISBN: 9780748641543
Published online March 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780748652136 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3366/edinburgh/9780748641543.003.0016
The Philosopher, As Such, and the Death Penalty

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Sometime around the year 2000, Derrida expressed a dialogue that was later published with the title De quoi demain . . ., For What Tomorrow . . . In these sentences, he is categorically and rather uncharacteristically firm in hammering home the superlatives, in naming ‘the most significant and most stupefying fact, the most stupefied as well in the history of Western philosophy’. Upon the author's rereading of these sentences, it is as if Derrida, in the name of philosophers or philosophy as such, were giving (himself) a big smack, delivering a slap to ‘the history of Western philosophy’. This slap is symbolic, one might say, but it is no less stupefying.

Keywords: Derrida; dialogue; superlatives; language; Western philosophy

Chapter.  3098 words. 

Subjects: Literary Theory and Cultural Studies

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