Chapter

Ethnic Identity, Networks and Social Capital: The Anatomy and Function of Scottish Associationalism

Tanja Bueltmann

in Scottish Ethnicity and the Making of New Zealand Society, 1850-1930

Published by Edinburgh University Press

Published in print July 2011 | ISBN: 9780748641550
Published online March 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780748653553 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3366/edinburgh/9780748641550.003.0005
Ethnic Identity, Networks and Social Capital: The Anatomy and Function of Scottish Associationalism

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Sentimental expressions of Scottish identity played their part in the shaping of Scottish associational life. Many of the Scots who chose to become members of associations created a social and celebratory Scottishness in a fully conscious act of manufacture, because they were keen to preserve their homeland culture. They were driven, at least in part, by melancholy, a sense of longing underlying their desire to wallow in memories of ‘auld Scotia’. However, to fully understand Scottish associationalism in New Zealand, it is necessary to move behind the façade of such romantic perceptions of Scottishness, exploring the organisational structures of the different societies that served as vehicles for ethnic expression; their membership bases; and the connections that existed between members within and outside of the associational bounds. While the previous chapter was organised in terms of the periodisation of associational culture, this chapter is thematically arranged.

Keywords: Scottish societies; associations; associational life; Scottish identity

Chapter.  11780 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Regional and Area Studies

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