Chapter

Recycled Hollywood for the TV Generation: The Rise of Parody and the Fall of Mel Brooks the Director, 1974–95

Alex Symons

in Mel Brooks in the Cultural Industries

Published by Edinburgh University Press

Published in print September 2012 | ISBN: 9780748649587
Published online January 2013 | e-ISBN: 9780748676484 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3366/edinburgh/9780748649587.003.0005
Recycled Hollywood for the TV Generation: The Rise of Parody and the Fall of Mel Brooks the Director, 1974–95

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This chapter discusses how Brooks did not just recycle Hollywood film, but hybridised film content together with a wide range of content from television. It is through hybridising film with television that Brooks made his reputation as a director with Blazing Saddles (1974) and Young Frankenstein (1974), and in doing so, contributed towards a cycle of television-film hybrids that continues today. The rise of television-film hybrids has been central to the production of what has come to be understood by critics as the parody film genre. Furthermore, it was, in part, Brooks's own apparent choice not to capitalise on television content to the same extent in his subsequent films Spaceballs (1987), Robin Hood: Men in Tights (1993), and Dracula: Dead and Loving It (1995) that brought about the end of his career as a film director.

Keywords: Hollywood film productions; parody films; motion pictures; television-film hybrids

Chapter.  18932 words. 

Subjects: Film

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