Journal Article

<b><i>Enterobacteriaceae</i> and <i>Salmonella</i> recovered from nonsanitized and sanitized broiler hatching eggs</b>

M. T. Musgrove, C. B. Stephens, D. V. Bourassa, N. A. Cox, J. M. Mauldin, M. E. Berrang and R. J. Buhr

in The Journal of Applied Poultry Research

Volume 23, issue 3, pages 516-522
Published in print September 2014 | ISSN: 1056-6171
Published online August 2014 | e-ISSN: 1537-0437 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3382/japr.2014-00975
Enterobacteriaceae and Salmonella recovered from nonsanitized and sanitized broiler hatching eggs

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  • Zoology and Animal Sciences
  • Animal Pathology and Diseases
  • Animal Physiology
  • Ornithology
  • Veterinary Medicine

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Sanitizing hatching eggs may reduce the chances that a broiler flock will become colonized with Salmonella and reduce the numbers of other microorganisms, such as Enterobacteriaceae, that can depress hatchability. An experiment was conducted to determine if a quaternary-biguanide sanitizer applied as foam or spray would reduce Enterobacteriaceae or Salmonella naturally occurring on broiler hatching eggs. The sanitizer was applied to buggies of 5,040 eggs the day before set (one buggy/treatment at each of 2 settings). Treated eggs were compared with untreated controls. Foam application lowered Enterobacteriaceae prevalence at set (0 vs. 18%) and transfer (5 vs. 28%); spraying was effective only when eggs were set (2.5 vs. 11%). At transfer spray, treated and control eggs were 19% Enterobacteriaceae-positive. Five Salmonella-positives were recorded during the study. No indication that the sanitizer was effective in reducing Salmonella prevalence when applied as foam was observed (3/120 vs. 1/120). No Salmonella were recovered from spray-treated eggs. No statistically significant difference for Salmonella prevalence was noted, but with such a low rate of recovery it is difficult to draw a firm conclusion. However, the sanitizer applied as foam was effective at decreasing the prevalence of Enterobacteriaceae (a family of bacteria that includes Salmonella and Escherichia coli), and is present more often and in higher numbers than Salmonella.

Keywords: hatchery; microbiology; eggs; sanitation; sanitizer

Journal Article.  3752 words. 

Subjects: Zoology and Animal Sciences ; Animal Pathology and Diseases ; Animal Physiology ; Ornithology ; Veterinary Medicine

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