Journal Article

Atypical lymphocytes and leukocytes in the peripheral circulation of caged hens

Paul F. Cotter

in Poultry Science

Volume 94, issue 7, pages 1439-1445
Published in print July 2015 | ISSN: 0032-5791
Published online June 2015 | e-ISSN: 1525-3171 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3382/ps/pev157
Atypical lymphocytes and leukocytes in the peripheral circulation of caged hens

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Zoology and Animal Sciences
  • Animal Pathology and Diseases
  • Animal Physiology
  • Ornithology
  • Veterinary Medicine

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Lymphocytes comprise a family of cells descended from bursa and thymus progenitors whose differentiation is not possible by standard hematology. However, if they are small with a nuclear/cytoplasmic ratio near 1, they are “resting” at least in the microscopic sense. Activation, increases their size, and decreases the nuclear:cytoplasmic (N:C) ratio. Reactive cells are infrequent in healthy animal blood. Their presence indicates an immune response in progress, inflammation, stress, or other pathology. Here the purpose is to describe unusual leukocytes and lymphocytes found in the periphery of commercial hens. Samples of Wright stained blood films obtained from commercial hens housed in modern cages are the data source. Photomicroscopy used an Olympus CX41 light microscope equipped with an Infinity-2 1.4 megapixel charge-coupled device (CCD) Universal Serial Bus (USB) 2.0 camera, at 100× (oil) magnification. Collectively these cells illustrate a continuum between mildly “reactive” to grossly “atypical” states. The description begins with normal resting cells, proceeds to mildly atypical, and concludes with grossly abnormal cells. Bone marrow cells, a source of plasmacytes, are included for comparison. Examples of circulating plasmacytes, large plasmacytoid lymphocytes (LPL), foam cells, and cells expressing properties of more than one lineage are included. The importance of these observations lies in their contribution to cytology, hematology, and immunology. Last, because of the wide use of heterophil:lymphocyte ratios (H:L) as a stress measure they bear directly the welfare issues of caged animals. When cells similar to the types described here are in blood, they indicate stress independent of H:L or other standard measures.

Keywords: plasmacytes; foam cells; plasmacytoid lymphocytes; atypia; welfare

Journal Article.  3513 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Zoology and Animal Sciences ; Animal Pathology and Diseases ; Animal Physiology ; Ornithology ; Veterinary Medicine

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.