Chapter

After Emancipation: Abraham Lincoln's Black Dream

John Y. Simon, Harold Holzer and Dawn Vogel

in Lincoln Revisited

Published by Fordham University Press

Published in print May 2007 | ISBN: 9780823227365
Published online September 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780823240869 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5422/fordham/9780823227365.003.0013
After Emancipation: Abraham Lincoln's Black Dream

Show Summary Details

Preview

Most of this criticism focuses on the pre-Emancipation Proclamation Abraham Lincoln and all, but ignores Lincoln's handling of black freedom after the Proclamation. This chapter takes up the subject of what Lincoln learned and did not learn during the war. First, it examines the subject of Lincoln's effort to colonize African-Americans outside the United States. Then the chapter turns to the large subject of Lincoln's attitudes toward the intellectual capacities of African-Americans. The chapter poses the question on how Lincoln's attitudes toward African-Americans in the post-Proclamation period might inform the understanding of the wisdom, necessity, and possible process of some modern system of restitution for the crime of American slavery. It also argues that Lincoln's emphasis on education for the freed people may have helped sow the seeds of failure during the Reconstruction era, and funding for African-American education today may again do only half the work that is needed.

Keywords: Abraham Lincoln; freed people; freedom; Emancipation Proclamation; African-Americans; restitution; slavery; education; Reconstruction

Chapter.  5206 words. 

Subjects: History of the Americas

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Fordham University Press »

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.