Chapter

Novel Subjects and Enabling Fictions: the Formal Articulation of International Human Rights Law

Joseph R. Slaughter

in Human Rights, Inc.

Published by Fordham University Press

Published in print December 2007 | ISBN: 9780823228171
Published online September 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780823241033 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5422/fordham/9780823228171.003.0002
Novel Subjects and Enabling Fictions: the Formal Articulation of International Human Rights Law

Show Summary Details

Preview

The United Nations delegates' encryption of Robinson Crusoe within the text of Article 29 of Universal Declaration of Human Rights, illustrates something of the historical cooperation between the novel and human rights between what is typically regarded as the sociocultural work of literature and the civil and political work of law. This chapter focuses on the formal, historical, rhetorical, and institutional conditions of international human rights law that make it especially dependent upon cultural forms to give its precepts moral force. It begins by analyzing the image of the human person, and the development of its personality, that the law both takes for granted and articulates, situating this figure at the intersection of natural and positive law approaches to personhood. Abstract rhetorical structures of the law in the chapter become most technically refined and commonly legible in the literary conventions of the Bildungsroman.

Keywords: United Nations; Robinson Crusoe; Article 29; Universal Declaration of Human Rights; human rights; human person; personality; Bildungsroman; human rights law

Chapter.  15360 words. 

Subjects: Literature

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Fordham University Press »

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.