Chapter

. Sovereignty at War

Marc Redfield

in The Rhetoric of Terror

Published by Fordham University Press

Published in print September 2009 | ISBN: 9780823231232
Published online September 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780823241118 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5422/fordham/9780823231232.003.0009
. Sovereignty at War

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The sovereign claim to exception was absolute, as always — the Bush administration's position was that the court had no business reviewing the case at all — but was checked in this instance by the court's own (“sovereign”) decision provisionally to integrate Guantánamo into the polity's rule of law. War is the ultimate enactment of the sovereign exception, as sovereignty has become more visibly fractured in the modern era, the word “war” has proliferated all the more virulently and become all the harder to pin down. Like the sovereignty it enacts, war is both inside and outside the law. The development of a permanent war economy in the early twentieth century began palpably to saturate the texture of civil life in the era of the Cold War.

Keywords: sovereignty; war; sovereign exception; civil life; war economy; Cold War

Chapter.  4268 words. 

Subjects: Literary Studies (20th Century onwards)

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