Chapter

Death and Unexpected Freedom

John K. Stutterheim

in The Diary of Prisoner 17326

Published by Fordham University Press

Published in print December 2009 | ISBN: 9780823231508
Published online January 2013 | e-ISBN: 9780823250745 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5422/fordham/9780823231508.003.0017

Series: World War II: The Global, Human, and Ethical Dimension

Death and Unexpected Freedom

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As the chapter opens with the bombing of a nearby harbour, the author expresses the hope that accompanied the care packages of the previous chapter and the possibility that freedom was drawing closer. The climax of this hope occurs when three planes fly nearby the camp and the realization that the war has ended as the entire worker population of the camp collectively rejoices. The Japanese commanding officer reluctantly announces that the war has ended and Japan has surrendered, a message which inspires palpable hope to all who hear it. The chapter concludes with the author finding a dear friend alone and seated on a chair, believing him dead.

Keywords: Surrender; Bombing; Planes; Dead

Chapter.  1638 words. 

Subjects: Social and Cultural History

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