Chapter

Rochdale Village and the Rise and Fall of Integrated Housing in New York City

Clarence Taylor

in Civil Rights in New York City

Published by Fordham University Press

Published in print April 2011 | ISBN: 9780823232895
Published online September 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780823240876 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5422/fordham/9780823232895.003.0005
Rochdale Village and the Rise and Fall of Integrated Housing in New York City

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Rochdale Village was a limited-equity, middle-income cooperative. Its apartments could not be resold for a profit, and with the average per room charges when opened of $21 a month, it was on the low end of the middle-income spectrum. It was laid out on a massive 170-acre superblock development, with no through streets, and only winding pedestrian paths, lined with newly planted trees, crossing a greensward connecting the twenty massive cruciform apartment buildings. Rochdale was a typical urban postwar housing development, in outward appearance differing from most others simply in its size. It was, in a word, wrote the historian Joshua Freeman, “nondescript.”

Keywords: Rochdale Village; housing development; cooperative; apartments; postwar housing

Chapter.  7707 words. 

Subjects: Social and Cultural History

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