Chapter

The Dead End of Despair: Bayard Rustin, the 1968 New York School Crisis, and the Struggle for Racial Justice

Clarence Taylor

in Civil Rights in New York City

Published by Fordham University Press

Published in print April 2011 | ISBN: 9780823232895
Published online September 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780823240876 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5422/fordham/9780823232895.003.0007
The Dead End of Despair: Bayard Rustin, the 1968 New York School Crisis, and the Struggle for Racial Justice

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Despite Bayard Rustin's long record at the forefront of the African American freedom struggle, in 1968 he distanced himself from black activists. The call for community control for both reflected and propelled the growing power of nationalist ideas and ideals among African Americans across the United States. The argument of Rustin's estrangement from old allies reflected a profound shift in his politics and in the movements of 1960s stands in contrast to much recent scholarship. Of late, historians have highlighted the essential continuity in Rustin's career and in the broader flow of recent American history. Their accounts have generated nuanced understandings of the interplay of integration and Black Nationalism in the African American struggle for social justice and of the enduring presence of both democratic ideals and racial inequality in American life.

Keywords: Bayard Rustin; African Americans; Black Nationalism; social justice; racial inequality

Chapter.  8635 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Social and Cultural History

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