Chapter

Teaching for Social Justice in the Engaged Classroom: The Intersection of Jesuit and Feminist Moral Philosophies

Karen L. Slattery, Ana C. Garner, Joyce M. Wolburg and Lynn H. Turner

in Jesuit and Feminist Education

Published by Fordham University Press

Published in print January 2012 | ISBN: 9780823233311
Published online May 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780823241743 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5422/fordham/9780823233311.003.0009
Teaching for Social Justice in the Engaged Classroom: The Intersection of Jesuit and Feminist Moral Philosophies

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This chapter weaves together the threads related to social justice, Christian ethics, and the ethic of care. In the process, it establishes a framework within which to interrogate feminist and Jesuit pedagogical practices related to teaching for social justice. This framework allows us to determine how social justice-related concepts, including emotion, power, and self-reflexivity, might more effectively be taught in university classrooms. The chapter first offers a definition of social justice. Second, it explores the similarities in foundational assumptions that animate both care-based and Christian moral theories, and contrasts those with the assumptions that underpin justice-based moral theories. It draws on the commonalities between Christian-and care-based assumptions to frame the critique of pedagogical practices germane to teaching for social justice and its related concepts. Third, it presents and offers a critique of an example of teaching for social justice that took place in an undergraduate communication course offered by a university instructor who describes herself as a feminist. The critique allows the exploration of how the intersections of Jesuit and feminist moral thinking inform teaching for social justice and, in turn, how practices of teaching for social justice inform the shared theories and concepts of feminism and Jesuit education.

Keywords: social justice; Christian ethics; ethics of care; feminist education; Jesuit education; pedagogy; moral thinking

Chapter.  7512 words. 

Subjects: Religious Studies

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