Chapter

“The Most Important Work on the Mission”: The Seminary of Saints John Fisher and Thomas More, 1919–1979

Nicholas M. Creary

in Domesticating a Religious Import

Published by Fordham University Press

Published in print April 2011 | ISBN: 9780823233342
Published online January 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780823241774 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5422/fordham/9780823233342.003.0004
“The Most Important Work on the Mission”: The Seminary of Saints John Fisher and Thomas More, 1919–1979

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In a commentary assessing the causes of the 1974 strike, W. F. Rea opined that many Africans became Catholics and entered the seminary for “unworthy motives, and mixed ones,” alleging they did so for the only higher educational opportunities available at the time. “But when they see their contemporaries in secondary schools and the Universities making more progress than they,” he continued, “they cannot face up to the fact that this is due to their own lack of capacity and blame everyone and everything except themselves.” He similarly alleged that Africans chose to become priests for the social status that advanced education in seminary training would bring them, and absolved the seminary administration of any responsibility for the strike. This chapter examines the changing relations between European Jesuit missionaries and African seminarians from the early 1930s to 1975.

Keywords: Africans; Catholics; educational opportunities; priests; social status; Jesuit missionaries

Chapter.  14811 words. 

Subjects: History of Religion

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