Chapter

“Each One a Pocket Hercules”: The Bantam Experiment and the Case of the Thirty-fifth Division

Peter Simkins

in Scraping the Barrel

Published by Fordham University Press

Published in print August 2012 | ISBN: 9780823239771
Published online January 2013 | e-ISBN: 9780823239818 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5422/fordham/9780823239771.003.0005
“Each One a Pocket Hercules”: The Bantam Experiment and the Case of the Thirty-fifth Division

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In 1914 the British army experienced a rush of volunteers. Physical standards were changed several times to manage the numbers, but many enthusiastic, patriotic men were below enlistment standards. Bantam battalions were then authorized to admit short but sturdy men. However, many men were enlisted who were short but not able to face the rigors of military service. Two divisions were initially formed, although only one fought with Bantams. It had a mediocre record in action, and was reorganized with men of normal physique. However, many of the Bantams were kept in the army, put into non-frontline roles.

Keywords: World War I; British Army; 35th (Bantam) Division; Battle of the Somme

Chapter.  10527 words. 

Subjects: Military History

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