Chapter

Lang Reparations

Gilya Gerda Schmidt

in Süssen Is Now Free of Jews

Published by Fordham University Press

Published in print July 2012 | ISBN: 9780823243297
Published online January 2013 | e-ISBN: 9780823243334 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5422/fordham/9780823243297.003.0010

Series: World War II: The Global, Human, and Ethical Dimension (FUP)

Lang Reparations

Show Summary Details

Preview

Reparations for real estate were a messy and lengthy and less than satisfactory process. At first, there were no laws to deal with these matters, so that the process stalled for years. Finally, in the 1950s and ‘60s, the courts were able to proceed with the many claims that were filed, also from the Lang heirs. The trustee and lawyers for the family were able to prove not only confiscation, but aggravated confiscation (schwere Entziehung) which made the crime of dispossession even more grave. Reparations claims could be made not only for real estate, but for loss of livelihood, emigration costs, loss of good health, loss of education, and many other losses. Some efforts were successful, others were not, often for outlandish reasons.

Keywords: Reparations; Lang heirs; aggravated confiscation; loss of livelihood; claims

Chapter.  10733 words. 

Subjects: History of the Americas

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Fordham University Press »

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.