Chapter

Nature and Culture

Don Cupitt

in Is Nothing Sacred?

Published by Fordham University Press

Published in print January 2002 | ISBN: 9780823222032
Published online March 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780823235322 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5422/fso/9780823222032.003.0010

Series: Perspectives in Continental Philosophy

Nature and Culture

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This chapter asserts that there is a new awareness on the power of technology, the priority and superiority of culture over nature. It is our responsibility to maintain the physical conditions of our own life. The chapter describes culture as the air that we breathe and it compares it to a wild thing that cannot be controlled or incorporated into anything else. Thus, culture is a natural product and the most significant development that it incorporates is the concept of the environment. The author defines himself to be a unique, eternal, rational soul and he states that God himself is pure, holy, and a complete subjectivity that only his personal identity could perfect. He states that he didn't desire for the world, nor the body and even other people, because God is only what he needs.

Keywords: culture; nature; environment; unique soul; rational soul; eternal soul; God

Chapter.  5930 words. 

Subjects: Philosophy of Religion

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