Chapter

Birth and the Powers of Horror: Julia Kristeva on Gender, Religion, and Death

Grace M. Jantzen

in Rethinking Philosophy of Religion

Published by Fordham University Press

Published in print January 2002 | ISBN: 9780823222063
Published online March 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780823235605 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5422/fso/9780823222063.003.0007

Series: Perspectives in Continental Philosophy

Birth and the Powers of Horror: Julia               Kristeva on Gender, Religion, and Death

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This chapter examines the thoughts of philosopher Julia Kristeva on gender, religion, and death. In her work, Kristeva suggested that human subjects are constituted by a series of splittings and such splittings are simultaneously essential for the development of mature autonomy. Her sensitivity to this power led her time and again to reconsider religious themes and figures. This chapter suggests that Kristeva's religious views has much in common with those of contemporary continental philosophers who find resources for destabilizing the hegemonic power of modernity in pre-modern texts and themes.

Keywords: Julia Kristeva; gender; religion; death; mature autonomy; continental philosophy

Chapter.  8368 words. 

Subjects: Philosophy of Religion

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