Chapter

Introduction

William J. Richardson

in Heidegger

Published by Fordham University Press

Published in print January 1993 | ISBN: 9780823222551
Published online March 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780823235247 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5422/fso/9780823222551.003.0001

Series: Perspectives in Continental Philosophy

Introduction

Show Summary Details

Preview

This chapter explores the problem of Being and the problem of thought. In discussing the problem of being, it also cites the grounding of metaphysics and the ontological difference between them. The problem of thought is explored in two ways: negatively and positively. During the course of Heidegger's development, he uses the word “philosophy” sometimes in a narrow sense, by which it identifies with metaphysics, and sometimes in the broad sense, as a response to Being's appeal. There is only one philosophical question that interests Heidegger—the question about Being and its truth.

Keywords: Being; thought; negative; positive; metaphysics; philosophy; ontological difference

Chapter.  9125 words. 

Subjects: Philosophy

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Fordham University Press »

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.