Chapter

The Correlation of Quantum Mechanics and Whitehead’s Philosophy

Michael Epperson

in Quantum Mechanics and the Philosophy of Alfred North Whitehead

Published by Fordham University Press

Published in print July 2004 | ISBN: 9780823223190
Published online March 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780823235551 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5422/fso/9780823223190.003.0005

Series: American Philosophy

The Correlation of Quantum Mechanics               and Whitehead’s Philosophy

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An ontological interpretation is distinguished from other interpretations when it demonstrates the form among the facts of human experience through imaginative hypothetical deduction, and when it employs Whitehead's desiderata through the decoherence effect and its constituents in the interpretation of quantum mechanics. To further explain his cosmological scheme, Whitehead ventured three references: the “old” quantum theory, the “new” quantum theory, focusing on the “fallacy of misplaced concreteness,” and the other version of the “new” quantum theory, directing its attention to the “vector relationship” between potential and a prior fact. The evolution and consolidation of the “physical pole” and the “mental pole” constitute the final outcome state or the “satisfaction,” which in return has consequences in the future (believed to be the path to openness). Despite this outstanding investigation, the principle of “what happens between” the stages continues to be a mystery. Along with the stages are obligations pertaining to subjective unity, objective identity and diversity, conceptual reproduction and reversion, transmutation, subjective harmony and intensity, freedom, and determination.

Keywords: ontological interpretation; Whitehead; cosmological scheme; quantum theory; misplaced concreteness; mental pole; physical pole; satisfaction; vector relationship

Chapter.  15546 words. 

Subjects: Philosophy of Mathematics and Logic

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