Chapter

Antigone’s Nomos

Samuel Weber

in Theatricality as Medium

Published by Fordham University Press

Published in print December 2004 | ISBN: 9780823224159
Published online March 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780823235841 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5422/fso/9780823224159.003.0005
Antigone’s Nomos

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A law is normally understood as a general supremacy, something that implies authority over a majority. When referring to the rule of law, the individual is only one of the cases that a law is applied to. The idea of having a law is usually accompanied by the different ideologies and the complex relationships that elements of a society deal with, whether it be by individual, by family, or by state. This chapter exemplifies how several instances in the play Antigone, the first of Sophocles' Theban tragedies, show how events that are explicit are dependent on the implicit or underlying ideas.

Keywords: law; rule of law; Antigone; society; individual; Sophocles

Chapter.  8134 words. 

Subjects: Philosophy of Language

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