Chapter

God: Poison or Cure?

David Wood

in Styles of Piety

Published by Fordham University Press

Published in print December 2006 | ISBN: 9780823225002
Published online March 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780823237081 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5422/fso/9780823225002.003.0012

Series: Perspectives in Continental Philosophy

God: Poison or Cure?

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This chapter refutes the previous chapter, arguing that any interpretation of Jacques Derrida as a neo-theologian offering “prayers” and “circumfession” must address the issue of how philosophy and autobiography become conflated, as well as the issue of how minimalist a definition of religion can be before the concept of religion is itself reduced beyond all recognition. Moreover, it is unclear if it is even possible to separate generic religious experience from organized religion. Ultimately, religious experience needs to be deconstructed as the misunderstanding of the age-old error of viewing personal revelations as essentially spiritual occurrences, rather than simply as philosophical meanderings. It would seem philosophically prudent to view faith and religious experience as mere artifacts of the attempt to explain the role of reason and its relationship to reality.

Keywords: Derrida; deconstruction; deconstructionism; religion; religious experience; faith; philosophy

Chapter.  3061 words. 

Subjects: Philosophy of Religion

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