Chapter

Prosopon and Icon: Two Premodern Ways of Thinking God

John Panteleimon Manoussakis

in After God

Published by Fordham University Press

Published in print March 2006 | ISBN: 9780823225316
Published online March 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780823236893 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5422/fso/9780823225316.003.0019

Series: Perspectives in Continental Philosophy

Prosopon and Icon: Two Premodern Ways of Thinking God

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This chapter examines premodern ways of thinking God through the prosopon and icon. It first discusses the ontological necessity of freedom toward death and love. It holds that the aporia in the discussion is the inability to imagine freedom prior to its existence. Then it distinguishes the Christian God from the God of the philosophers. The Christian God is a triune God who exists as loving relation among the three persons of the Trinity. In examining the hermeneutics of prosopon, it looks into its aesthetics, ethics, and role in religion. While in the discussion of the icon, it emphasizes the icon's value in relating to a point beyond itself, citing the example of the historic moment of Incarnation.

Keywords: Christian God; prosopon; icon; Incarnation; freedom; Trinity; hermeneutics

Chapter.  8381 words. 

Subjects: Christian Theology

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