Chapter

“This Is What We Must Not Do”

Leonard Lawlor

in The Implications of Immanence

Published by Fordham University Press

Published in print December 2006 | ISBN: 9780823226535
Published online March 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780823235742 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5422/fso/9780823226535.003.0010

Series: Perspectives in Continental Philosophy

“This Is What We Must Not             Do”

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This chapter addresses the question: why does Merleau–Ponty never make death, in any form—one's own death, the death of the other, prepersonal death—a kind of theme? It attempts to answer this question in three steps. First, it approaches an answer to the question of death by examining what Merleau–Ponty has to say about God. Second, it attempts to determine as precisely as possible the archē, the origin or principle, that Merleau–Ponty's archeology attempts to retrieve. Finally, it turns to Merleau–Ponty's one comment concerning Xavier Bichat's definition of life as the set of functions that resist death. This definition will return us to the idea of life and war.

Keywords: Merleau–Ponty; death; archaeology; life; war

Chapter.  6541 words. 

Subjects: Philosophy of Religion

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