Chapter

Liberty and Order in the Educational Anthropology of Maria Montessori

John J. McDermott

in The Drama of Possibility

Published by Fordham University Press

Published in print June 2007 | ISBN: 9780823226627
Published online March 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780823235704 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5422/fso/9780823226627.003.0030

Series: American Philosophy

Liberty and Order in               the Educational Anthropology of Maria Montessori

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This chapter presents an essay on the concepts of order and liberty in the educational anthropology of Maria Montessori. It was she, more than any other person in the 20th century, who realized that the life of the child demanded an education that was ordered, creative and distinctively personal. For her hope to be realized, it is imperative that Western civilization cease viewing the human situation as hierarchical, whereby the child is required to become an adult as quickly as possible. This essay notes that Montessori shares the late-19th century awareness of the developmental nature of humankind in an evolutionary context with other philosophers including William James, Henri Bergson and John Dewey.

Keywords: Maria Montessori; educational anthropology; liberty; order; child education; essay

Chapter.  8267 words. 

Subjects: Philosophy

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