Chapter

Nature as Culture: John Dewey and Aldo Leopold

Larry A. Hickman

in Pragmatism as Post-Postmodernism

Published by Fordham University Press

Published in print December 2007 | ISBN: 9780823228416
Published online March 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780823235544 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5422/fso/9780823228416.003.0009

Series: American Philosophy

Nature as Culture: John Dewey and               Aldo Leopold

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This chapter argues in defense against criticism that pragmatist John Dewey's work has little relevance to current debates regarding the status of nonhuman nature. It explains that though Dewey advocated for the importance in science in ameliorating the deplorable conditions of humanity, his notion of science was more comprehensive and revolutionary than his contemporaries ever grasped. It also highlights Dewey's belief that to view science as a tool for the domination of nature is to honor a conception of science that has become outdated.

Keywords: John Dewey; science; nonhuman nature; nature; pragmatism; humanity

Chapter.  7690 words. 

Subjects: Philosophy

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