Chapter

Introduction: Understandings of Plato and a Feature of Truth-Seeking Thought

Jeremy Barris

in The Crane's Walk

Published by Fordham University Press

Published in print April 2009 | ISBN: 9780823229130
Published online March 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780823235674 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5422/fso/9780823229130.003.0001
Introduction: Understandings of Plato and a Feature of Truth-Seeking             Thought

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Plato carefully explored the nature of what he saw as truth and its importance for life. To try to understand Plato's specific exploration of truth is therefore to try to understand the nature of truth and its importance for life. Plato is often ironic, saying or doing one thing in order to say or do another very different and often directly opposed thing. His irony is usually understood to occur in the context of a non-ironic doctrine about, or understanding of, or attitude toward the world and the place of people in it. In keeping with Plato's possible use of irony, it is arguable that there are strong similarities in the ways in which Plato and Aristotle used the theory of Ideas, each using it to say something else for his very different ends. If so, Plato was much more subtle about it. This subtlety runs to the root and core of his philosophy.

Keywords: Plato; truth; life; non-ironic doctrine; irony; Aristotle; theory of Ideas; philosophy

Chapter.  8470 words. 

Subjects: Philosophy of Language

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