Chapter

“The Rebel Spirit in Kentuck”: The Politics of Readjustment in a Border State, 1865–1868

Anne E. Marshall

in The Great Task Remaining Before Us

Published by Fordham University Press

Published in print July 2010 | ISBN: 9780823232024
Published online March 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780823240494 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5422/fso/9780823232024.003.0004

Series: Reconstructing America

“The Rebel Spirit in             Kentuck”: The Politics of Readjustment in a Border State,             1865–1868

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This chapter on Kentucky underscores how postwar violence extended to politics. Former antagonists on the battlefield would come together at the polls, making the politics of race common ground. This is referred to as Kentucky's second civil war, with “all of the vitriolic rhetoric and violent imagery of bloody Civil War engagements.” This time, however, the pro-Confederate forces won. Kentucky may not have been typical of former enemies in battle making comrades in peace, but it was typical of one result of the war: a Solid South. That judgment is open to many qualifications; nonetheless, surely most historians would agree that with each passing year Southern politics became more polarized. Dissent was a wedge that Democrats in particular could never tolerate.

Keywords: Civil War; postwar violence; politics; Confederates; Kentucky

Chapter.  6711 words. 

Subjects: History of the Americas

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