Chapter

“A New Field of Labor”: Anti‐slavery Women, Freedmen's Aid, and Political Power

Carol Faulkner

in The Great Task Remaining Before Us

Published by Fordham University Press

Published in print July 2010 | ISBN: 9780823232024
Published online March 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780823240494 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5422/fso/9780823232024.003.0006

Series: Reconstructing America

“A New Field of             Labor”: Anti‐slavery Women, Freedmen's Aid, and Political             Power

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This chapter rejects the division between war and Reconstruction. It focuses on the effects that reform efforts had on the reformers themselves—in this case antislavery women. Many historians use Appomattox as a convenient end not only to the war, but also to women's benevolent efforts. In fact, women's participation in such reform work grew more intense in the shift from sponsorship by the government to sponsorship by voluntary—usually Christian—associations. It is argued that only by extending the boundaries of the war into Reconstruction can we understand the gendered battles over emancipation, charity, and women's work.

Keywords: Civil War; reconstruction; reformers; antislavery women

Chapter.  5847 words. 

Subjects: History of the Americas

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