Chapter

Four Saints and Sinners

Mark N. Swanson

in The Coptic Papacy in Islamic Egypt (641–1517)

Published by American University in Cairo Press

Published in print September 2010 | ISBN: 9789774160936
Published online September 2011 | e-ISBN: 9781617970498 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5743/cairo/9789774160936.003.0004
Four Saints and Sinners

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A deposed and vengeful bishop, Bishop Michael led Ibn Tulun believed that the patriarch had vast wealth. He had little to say about the patriarch's twenty-eight years in office. It may also be indicative of a situation in which much of the decision-making power in the Church lay not with the patriarch but elsewhere—with wealthy and well-connected lay notables, or with a few particularly powerful bishops. There was some consternation among the bishops when they discovered that the holy monk they had elevated to the patriarchate in fact had a wife, but eventually they were reassured by her testimony to his holiness. It was during Menas' patriarchate that severe and protracted famine led to the depopulation and consolidation of some bishoprics.

Keywords: wealth; bishops; holiness; patriarchate; bishoprics

Chapter.  6420 words. 

Subjects: Early Christianity

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