Chapter

Seven Marginalized Patriarchs

Mark N. Swanson

in The Coptic Papacy in Islamic Egypt (641–1517)

Published by American University in Cairo Press

Published in print September 2010 | ISBN: 9789774160936
Published online September 2011 | e-ISBN: 9781617970498 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5743/cairo/9789774160936.003.0007
Seven Marginalized Patriarchs

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The Egyptian Melkite Church elected a new patriarch in the year 1250, and leading Copts realized that they would be placed at a disadvantage over the governing authorities if they could not produce a patriarch of their own. The election of a new patriarch quickly became bogged down in the rivalry between the lay notables of Misr (Old Cairo) and those of al-Qahirah (Cairo). The history of the Patriarchs and the patriarchal history attributed to Yusab give little information; there is a detailed passage about patriarchs Gabriel III and John VII in al-Nahj al-sadid wa-l-durr al-farid fima ba'd Tarikh Ibn al-'Amid. The correct way and singular pearl concern came after the History of Ibn al-'Amid', a chronicle of the years 1260—1341 by the Coptic historian al-Mufaddal ibn Abi l-Fada'i.

Keywords: Melkite; Yusab; authorities; singular pearl; historian

Chapter.  4404 words. 

Subjects: Early Christianity

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