Chapter

Cousins, Neighbors, and Citizens in Imbaba the Genesis and Self-neutralization of a Rebel Political Territory

Diane Singerman

in Cairo Contested

Published by American University in Cairo Press

Published in print October 2009 | ISBN: 9789774162886
Published online September 2011 | e-ISBN: 9781617970351 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5743/cairo/9789774162886.003.0012
Cousins, Neighbors, and Citizens in Imbaba the Genesis and Self-neutralization of a Rebel Political Territory

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This chapter deals with the transformation of former Islamists in Imbaba or Islamist sympathizers into “neo-notables” and party officials. It argues that they were ultimately defending “the dignity of their community and its right to be involved in the city.”. It specifically demonstrates how political allegiances were emancipated from regional loyalties in the 1990s and then attached themselves to spatial domains, becoming territorialized in certain ways, as they also integrated with the state. It also presents the ways Islamist involvement has dominated the process and yet, under the very nose of its rebellious leaders, has participated in forming the state. Next, it reveals that this spatial disposition of political ties led to reinforcing ties to family lineage, although they changed from assigned or compulsory affiliations to conscious and voluntary ones. In Imbaba, two polarities of political figures exist — the idealized types of the fatwana and the merchant notable — and they do not overlap.

Keywords: Imbaba; neo-notables; party officials; rebel political territory; Islamists; fatwana; merchant notable; family lineage

Chapter.  9232 words. 

Subjects: International Relations

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