Chapter

The Literary Advantages of Protestantism

Roy Gottfried

in Joyce's Misbelief

Published by University Press of Florida

Published in print January 2008 | ISBN: 9780813031675
Published online September 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780813038506 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5744/florida/9780813031675.003.0004
The Literary Advantages of Protestantism

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This chapter discusses Joyce's persistent interest in schismatic Anglican worship. This chapter chronicles Joyce's fascination in Anglican worship wherein he frequently cited the English Bible and the Anglican Book of Common Prayer within the constructs of his immense interest in epiclesis and his interest in schismatic constructs. Joyce was attracted to whatever order he did not belong to and was suspicions of those to which he did belong. For him to be attracted was to be in a position of choosing freedom from control, to rend authority, and to be in constant schismatic motion. Protestantism appealed to Joyce because as a religion, it made no claim on him. In this double exchange of rebellion and loyalty, he could be fascinated by individuals who rejected the unrigorous latitudinarianism and the logical laxity of Anglicanism to adopt voluntarily the strictures of Rome from which he sought freedom.

Keywords: Joyce; schismatic Anglican worship; Anglicans; epiclesis; schismatic; Protestantism

Chapter.  20407 words. 

Subjects: Literary Studies (20th Century onwards)

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