Chapter

His Master's Voice and Joyce

Thomas Jackson Rice

in Cannibal Joyce

Published by University Press of Florida

Published in print March 2008 | ISBN: 9780813032191
Published online September 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780813038810 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5744/florida/9780813032191.003.0007
His Master's Voice and Joyce

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This chapter discusses the impact of the emergent forces in contemporary popular culture that have a direct influence on Joyce' conception of artistic creativity and explorations of the possibilities of fiction especially in his last two books Ulysses and Finnegans Wake. The introduction of new communication means particularly the introduction of phonograph that may have influenced and impacted on the writings of Joyce. In this chapter, Joyce' response to the technology of sound is examined wherein he found a realization and awareness of the beauty that had vanished in the silent reading of the printed text; rather than disappearing, the voice of the storyteller becomes the “talking machine” of the new modernist novel.

Keywords: popular culture; new communication; phonograph; silent reading; technology of sound; Joyce; storyteller; talking machine; modernist novel

Chapter.  6775 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Literary Studies (20th Century onwards)

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