Chapter

Living Conditions, Mortality, and Social Organization in Campeche during the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries

Mónica Rodríguez Pérez

in Natives, Europeans, and Africans in Colonial Campeche

Published by University Press of Florida

Published in print November 2010 | ISBN: 9780813034928
Published online September 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780813039626 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5744/florida/9780813034928.003.0005
Living Conditions, Mortality, and Social Organization in Campeche during the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries

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The early years of the colony were a time of adaptation and assimilation for the recently established multiethnic society of San Francisco de Campeche. Africans, Spaniards, natives, and a growing number of mestizos embodied a growing social and economic apparatus that would reflect not only ethnic diversity but also disparity as to privileges, living conditions, and access to resources. The point of departure of this chapter is that social heterogeneity, together with different predispositions to disease of each ethnic group, should lead to differentiated morbidity and mortality rates. This chapter tests this hypothesis by evaluating the distribution of disease and stress markers in the human remains buried below Campeche's main square. The chapter compares this study's findings with the results from other New World colonial sites and discusses them from biocultural, economic, and social perspectives.

Keywords: social organization; living condition; Campeche; New World; colonial sites; ethnic groups; main square

Chapter.  4694 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: History and Theory of Archaeology

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