Chapter

In which are the author's conclusion and defense of these histories to those who may see these materials, making known that in Spain among some Latinists and authoritative persons it was said that the historian of such new and strange studies ought to have written them in the Latin language; and later there was controversy among the aforesaid—some faulting him, others supporting him; and, of course, there was someone to write to him in the Indies concerning the deliberation pro and con in Spain; to which the author responded with a letter which here, reader, you may judge for yourself, providing that impartially, humanely, and calmly you weigh his response in the balance of justice, giving it due reason and truth to better consider, ponder, and decide the correct verdict; note what he says.

Gonzalo Fernández de Oviedo

in Misfortunes and Shipwrecks in the Seas of the Indies, Islands, and Mainland of the Ocean Sea (1513–1548)

Published by University Press of Florida

Published in print March 2011 | ISBN: 9780813035406
Published online September 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780813038377 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5744/florida/9780813035406.003.0031
In which are the author's conclusion and defense of these histories to those who may see these materials, making known that in Spain among some Latinists and authoritative persons it was said that the historian of such new and strange studies ought to have written them in the Latin language; and later there was controversy among the aforesaid—some faulting him, others supporting him; and, of course, there was someone to write to him in the Indies concerning the deliberation pro and con in Spain; to which the author responded with a letter which here, reader, you may judge for yourself, providing that impartially, humanely, and calmly you weigh his response in the balance of justice, giving it due reason and truth to better consider, ponder, and decide the correct verdict; note what he says.

More Like This

Show all results sharing this subject:

  • Early Modern History (1500 to 1700)

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

It is a universal rule that all the Chaldean, Hebrew, Greek, and Latin writers wrote in the language they intended best to be understood and most accessible to their readers. So, since the Castilian language is at present widely communicated throughout so many empires and kingdoms, those who write in it are not to be held in less esteem than those who have written in the other languages. Thus, as to what seems unsuitable to friends or critics, writing in the native language is more to be praised than to be disdained as a defect. These histories in this book being more widely understood by the people of Spain who first navigated the parts discussed here and alone possessed them above all the number of Christians and all others from Africa, Asia, or Europe.

Keywords: Castilian; rule; Latin; language; Spain; Europe; Latinists; Indies

Chapter.  2348 words. 

Subjects: Early Modern History (1500 to 1700)

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.