Chapter

Sacrifice, Ritual, and Canonical Violence in the British/African Drama of T. S. Eliot, Caryl Churchill, and Wole Soyinka

Simon Lewis

in British and African Literature in Transnational Context

Published by University Press of Florida

Published in print May 2011 | ISBN: 9780813036021
Published online September 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780813038636 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5744/florida/9780813036021.003.0006
Sacrifice, Ritual, and Canonical Violence in the British/African Drama of T. S. Eliot, Caryl Churchill, and Wole Soyinka

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This chapter tries to portray that the British drama's canon illustrates the stubborn “otherness” of Africa, permitting the repetition of stereotypical, historically incurious representations of Africa by British dramatists—whether conservative or progressive—while still holding Anglophone African writers at arm's length. The chapter scrutinizes three plays: The Cocktail Party by T. S. Eliot, Death and the King's Horseman by Wole Soyinka, and Cloud Nine by Caryl Churchill. All these novels re-create a moment in colonial history as per the author's modern point of view.

Keywords: British drama; Africa; British novelists; The Cocktail Party; T. S. Eliot; Death and the King's Horseman; Wole Soyinka; Cloud Nine; Caryl Churchill

Chapter.  5812 words. 

Subjects: Literature

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