Chapter

Early Mounds and Monumental Art in Ancient Amazonia: History, Scale, Function, and Social Ecology

Anna C. Roosevelt, J. Douglas, B. Bevan, Maura Imazio da Silveira and L. Brown

in Early New World Monumentality

Published by University Press of Florida

Published in print May 2012 | ISBN: 9780813038087
Published online September 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780813043128 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5744/florida/9780813038087.003.0010
Early Mounds and Monumental Art in Ancient Amazonia: History, Scale, Function, and Social Ecology

Show Summary Details

Preview

A truism of the study of ancient complex societies has been that only centralized, stratified, fully agricultural complex societies have what it takes to need, build, maintain, and use monumental architecture. Archaeologists have even considered the presence of such structures as proof that an ancient society was an agricultural state. But the growing archaeological record from different world regions is providing proof that organization, subsistence, and architecture have not covaried in the way expected. In the meantime, the theory of heterarchy has emerged to explore alternatives to organize and feed complex societies that make and use monumental constructions. In this chapter, we evaluate the theories with basic information about the history, function, and socioeconomic context of monumental architecture in ancient Brazil.

Keywords: ancient Brazil; ancient complex societies; monumental construction

Chapter.  11616 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Prehistoric Archaeology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.