Chapter

Violence against Women: Differential Treatment of Local and Foreign Females in the Heartland of the Wari Empire, Peru

Tiffiny A. Tung

in The Bioarchaeology of Violence

Published by University Press of Florida

Published in print August 2012 | ISBN: 9780813041506
Published online January 2013 | e-ISBN: 9780813043876 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5744/florida/9780813041506.003.0010
Violence against Women: Differential Treatment of Local and Foreign Females in the Heartland of the Wari Empire, Peru

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Previous studies of iconographic and skeletal evidence suggest that a Wari (AD 600-1000) military class in the Peruvian Andes engaged in the capture of prisoners from both local and foreign locales. Captives include men and children, suggesting that battlefields alone were not the source of captives, for children are rarely encountered in warfare battles. Rather, village raids were the likely context in which all age groups would have been encountered. Women also may have been taken in these raids and transported back to the Wari heartland site of Conchopata. While osteological data indicate that male and child captives were transformed into trophy heads and deposited in ritual structures, it remains unclear what happened to women. Tiffiny A. Tung explores the frequency and patterning of violence-related trauma among the Conchopata population, and how it differed by gender and locals versus foreigners.

Keywords: Captives; Trophy heads; Gender; Children; Identity; Female-related violence

Chapter.  5982 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Prehistoric Archaeology

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