Chapter

“A Sponge Soaking up All the Money”: Alcohol, Taverns, Vinaterías, and the Bourbon Reforms in Mid-Eighteenth-Century Santiago de los Caballeros, Guatemala

Alvis E. Dunn

in Distilling the Influence of Alcohol

Published by University Press of Florida

Published in print October 2012 | ISBN: 9780813041629
Published online January 2013 | e-ISBN: 9780813043432 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5744/florida/9780813041629.003.0004
“A Sponge Soaking up All the Money”: Alcohol, Taverns, Vinaterías, and the Bourbon Reforms in Mid-Eighteenth-Century Santiago de los Caballeros, Guatemala

Show Summary Details

Preview

When the Royal Monopoly on Alcohol was established in 1755 in the Kingdom of Guatemala, a subunit of the Viceroyalty of New Spain, it was the Town Council of the capital city, Antigua, rather than a private individual, that was granted control over production, distribution, and consumption. This chapter by Alvis E. Dunn analyzes the political dynamics in play between imperial and municipal governments and local merchants and consumers. Exactly how alcohol was to be made available, where, when, and to whom, and most fundamentally, how it was to be taxed, became the concern of each of these sectors of the community. As the holder of the monopoly, Antigua’s Town Council moved to create a distillery and taverns where it sold its own, locally brewed aguardiente but also licensed and regulated a number of privately owned and operated drink houses, called vinaterias, where only imported wine and liquor were sold and consumed. Perhaps inevitably there was disagreement on how these establishments should be managed. Because of these conflicting interests the urban culture of drink in Central America was one of the earliest contexts where Bourbon Reform policy and the home rule impulse clashed.

Keywords: Tavern; Wine; Liquor; Monopoly; Antigua; Guatemala; Bourbon Reforms

Chapter.  9798 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Society and Culture

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.