Chapter

Riots, Disturbances, Insurrection, and War: Armed Opposition to the Imperial Ideal

Patrick H. Hase

in The Six-Day War of 1899

Published by Hong Kong University Press

Published in print April 2008 | ISBN: 9789622098992
Published online September 2011 | e-ISBN: 9789882207592 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5790/hongkong/9789622098992.003.0003
Riots, Disturbances, Insurrection, and War: Armed Opposition to the Imperial Ideal

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Opposition to the British could take the form of demonstrations, riots, or other civil disturbances, or else insurrection, rebellion, and open war. The reaction of the Imperial authorities differed sharply as to how to deal on the one hand with civil disturbance, and on the other with rebellion. The one was to be “pacified”, the other “suppressed”. The insurrection, rebellion, and open war are first introduced. The role of the Imperial Army in dealing with rebellion or open war is also shown. It then describes the civil disturbance. It was an essential feature of British Imperial law that the regular Army could not normally take any active military action within any area with a settled civilian Government, without the consent of the civilian authorities. In addition, April 1899 disturbances in the New Territories are discussed.

Keywords: British Imperial law; riots; civil disturbances; insurrection; rebellion; open war; Imperial authorities; Imperial Army

Chapter.  7130 words. 

Subjects: Asian History

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