Chapter

Civil and Other Wars — Rebels, Mercenaries and More Dope

Paul French

in Through the Looking Glass

Published by Hong Kong University Press

Published in print May 2010 | ISBN: 9789622099821
Published online September 2011 | e-ISBN: 9789882207622 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5790/hongkong/9789622099821.003.0003
Civil and Other Wars — Rebels, Mercenaries and More Dope

Show Summary Details

Preview

The foreigners who had arrived to claim their rights in the treaty port of Shanghai had barely begun to get to work when the Taiping Heavenly Kingdom suddenly appeared in revolt and threatened the very existence of the Qing dynasty. Much of the early writing on the Taiping followed on from the end of the First Opium War through to Lord Elgin's mission to Beijing. The Elgin Mission and a major change in Sino-foreign relations for the English-language press in China are discussed. Karl Marx commented frequently on China in his regular articles for the New York Daily Tribune. Most of Marx and Frederich Engels' articles dealt with the run-up to and then the conflict that became the Second Opium War as well as the Taiping Rebellion. They were clearly against the opium trade. Felice Beato, John Thomson, William Pryor Floyd, and Milton Miller are the important photographers in China. The Shanghai explosion is highlighted. Eventually, the foreign treaty ports were peaceful and were becoming firm bastions of trade with their own established papers and press barons, while the European powers continued to clash with China, exciting journalists.

Keywords: Taiping Heavenly Kingdom; Elgin Mission; Second Opium War; Karl Marx; Frederich Engels; Felice Beato; John Thomson; William Pryor Floyd; Milton Miller; China

Chapter.  11391 words. 

Subjects: Asian History

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Hong Kong University Press »

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.