Chapter

A Central Role for Priests

John R. Dichtl

in Frontiers of Faith

Published by University Press of Kentucky

Published in print May 2008 | ISBN: 9780813124865
Published online September 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780813135106 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5810/kentucky/9780813124865.003.0002
A Central Role for Priests

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As Father Badin passed through Pennsylvania's southwestern corner during the fall of 1807, he claimed that he had “found Catholics almost every where” as he believed that there were more than those he had actually encountered that proliferated in areas between the Monongahela and Ohio rivers. He included in his report to Bishop Carroll the possible obstructions that the faithful had to face, and that some Catholics did not fully acknowledge what they were and fell into latitudinarianism. The cause of this, as pointed out by Batin, was that there were no clergy or priests for these people to commune with. To address the need for more priests, the report stated, the appropriate priests for places such as southwestern Pennsylvania should be dexterous, indefatigable, and resistant to disappointments, disagreeable weather, and other such circumstances.

Keywords: Father Badin; Monongahela river; Ohio river; Bishop Carroll; clergy; priests

Chapter.  12015 words. 

Subjects: History of Religion

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