Chapter

Different Kentuckys

James C. Klotter and Freda C. Klotter

in A Concise History of Kentucky

Published by University Press of Kentucky

Published in print March 2008 | ISBN: 9780813124988
Published online September 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780813135298 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5810/kentucky/9780813124988.003.0003
Different Kentuckys

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In terms of population, Kentucky may be ranked in the middle since it has served as the home to more than 4 million people, but this ranking has changed throughout the years. After it became a state, Kentucky housed about 221,000 men, women, and children, and its population initially experienced rapid growth. Kentucky is not without diversity as it officially is made up of 91 percent whites, 7 percent blacks, and the remaining 2 percent is composed of people from various other backgrounds. It is important to note, however, that the population of Kentucky was a lot more diverse two hundred years ago than today. While 19 percent were African Americans, 52 percent may have had ties with England, 25 percent were from Ireland, 9 percent were full-blooded Irish, about 7 percent were Welsh, and 5 percent were German. This chapter explains the different people, living setups, land use, and other such aspects of life in early Kentucky.

Keywords: state; people; land use; living setup; background; diversity

Chapter.  5867 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: History of the Americas

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