Chapter

The Government of Kentucky

James C. Klotter and Freda C. Klotter

in A Concise History of Kentucky

Published by University Press of Kentucky

Published in print March 2008 | ISBN: 9780813124988
Published online September 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780813135298 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5810/kentucky/9780813124988.003.0004
The Government of Kentucky

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The tax monies paid by the citizens of Kentucky were received by the Kentucky's treasurer in order to operate the state. The treasurer of second half of the nineteenth century, “Honest Dick” Tate, however, was not honest at all. He had been collecting the state's money for twenty years and in 1888, he was found to have left the office with all of the state's money. His actions proved to have significant effects over the next century. In its early beginnings as a state, Kentucky called itself a commonwealth since it originated from Virginia, and formulated its own constitution. This included some of the state's voting practices and the right to vote. As a state, Kentucky had the executive, judicial, and legislative branches of state-level government. This chapter provides a discussion regarding the three branches, as well as some insights regarding the mystery of “Honest Dick” Tate.

Keywords: Honest Dick Tate; voting practices; constitution; executive branch; legislative branch; judicial branch; government

Chapter.  3115 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: History of the Americas

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