Chapter

Woman Suffrage

Janet G. Hudson

in Entangled by White Supremacy

Published by University Press of Kentucky

Published in print March 2009 | ISBN: 9780813125022
Published online September 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780813135182 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5810/kentucky/9780813125022.003.0009
Woman Suffrage

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White reformers evidently expressed preference in gaining control over the electorate's character and scope through as much as possible leaning towards what was perceived as the “better sort”. Progressives advocated that the enfranchisement of women may prove as an effective means for infusing the better sort into the electorate since women, especially those of the middle class, advocated a virtuous quality to politics. Compared to other aspects of the reforms, the issue of woman suffrage initiated the division among white reformers as some would view this action as a threat to white supremacy and since the issue entailed federal involvement. This chapter demonstrates how the limited success of the woman suffrage movement could be attributed to the maintaining of traditional gender roles and white supremacy.

Keywords: gender roles; woman suffrage; woman enfranchisement; electorate; federal involvement

Chapter.  6022 words. 

Subjects: History of the Americas

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