Chapter

Taking on Mission Impossible

Mark L. Bradley

in Bluecoats and Tar Heels

Published by University Press of Kentucky

Published in print January 2009 | ISBN: 9780813125077
Published online September 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780813135120 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5810/kentucky/9780813125077.003.0001
Taking on Mission Impossible

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Albion W. Tourgée's novel A Fool's Errand attempted to shed light on how the postwar Reconstruction in the South experienced failure. The northern Reconstruction policy was attributed with a certain degree of moderation. President Andrew Johnson's proposed Reconstruction plan proved to be more compassionate as the southern states had to repeal their secession ordinances, reject their war debt, and ratify the Thirteenth Amendment that ended slavery to rejoin the Union. Along with the pardon that was granted to anyone who applied, the president attempted to restore confiscated southern areas to their owners. While this action turned down the hopes of receiving aid from the federal government, the livelihood of former slaves were still determined by their former masters. This chapter illustrates the effects of presidential Reconstruction on ex-Confederates, particularly to those in North Carolina.

Keywords: Presidential Reconstruction; President Andrew Johnson; Reconstruction plan; Union; Confederate; North Carolina

Chapter.  2293 words. 

Subjects: History of the Americas

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